Pork chops Japanese style ポークチョップ

japanese cake

Pork chops are a rather popular cut in the US. Most popular are loin chops with rib attached (rib chops). One weekend, I bought a rather large pork loin without bones. Since it was large, I decided to cut off 4 loin chops before I trussed and seasoned the remaining loin for our usual  hot smoked pork on our Weber grill.  I wondered how I should cook the chops and decide to use a Japanese recipe. I grew up with simply sautéed pork chops in Japan but I wanted to do something a bit different. After reading through a few recipes, I made modified Japanese pork chops. I served them with sautéed pencil green asparagus and  corn shuffle my wife made unmolded and cut in half.

The sauce also included onion and shiitake mushroom.

I probably over cooked it and it came out a bit dry but the sauce helped.

Ingredients: (for 4 servings).

Four Pork loin chops (or rib chops).

Salt and pepper for seasoning

Flour for dredging

Olive oil

For sauce

One medium onion, halved and sliced

4 tbs ketchup

4 tbs worchestershire sauce

1/3 cup dry red wine

3 fresh shiitake mushroom, stem removed and sliced

2 tbs butter (or olive oil).

Directions:

Season both sides of the chops with salt and pepper, dredge them in flour.

Cook in a small amount of butter or olive oil until nicely browned (see below), turn them over and repeat.

Set the chops aside on a plate

Add the onion in the same pan and sauté until cooked and add the shiitake mushroom and continue cooking for several more minutes,

Put the vegetables in on the side of the pan, add the ketchup and cook it while stirring until the ketchup becomes caramelized and dark.

Add the red wine and Worcestershire sauce and mix and cook for a few minutes until the sauce lightly thickens.

Put back the chops and coat them with sauce (see below) to complete cooking the chops.

Serve hot with the sauce on the top. In Japan, the chops are served precut into bite sized pieces for ease of eating with chopsticks. This was not bad but the chops were a bit on the dry side.

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