Dirty Rice-Cơm Lòng Gà/Vịt kiểu Mỹ

Vietnamese food

   
    Every year we’re all taking about sharing, feeding hungry kids, people around this time.   Why can someone  be hungry in this country? A bowl of rice with a little of almost nothing can fill up an empty tummy and it is very cheap if we buy a big bag (50 lbs) at oriental store or Cash and carry store.
   This is a traditional Cajun dish.  A southern America cooked rice with  ground giblets/offal and finely minced/almost puree liver which gives the rice a dirty look. It is very cheap to make and full of nutrition. Try this at least one time if you do not like liver because the liver texture and flavor almost disappear in this dish. I do not like the texture of ground gizzard so I do not use.
   The Cajun seasoning from McCormick consists of salt, black pepper, red pepper, garlic, onion, paprika, celery seeds and thyme/oregano.  Emeril has a recipe of mixed herbs in the link below.
   Any rice you have will be good as long you know how to adjust the water to make the cooked rice on the dry side (soft, tender but not mushy). Leftover rice made a good dirty rice too.A rice cooker is nice if you want to eat more rice daily like Asian but you can cook rice in a saucepan but need more broth/water.  Japan made rice cookers are more expensive but very durable.  One of mine lasts more than 10 years.  China made ones are cheaper, still made good cook rice but not last very long.

 
Ingredients:  make 4 servings about 1.5 cups each
1½ cups long grain rice (Thai Jasmine rice/blue deer brand is used for this recipe)
1½ cups chicken broth, canned or homemade for rice cooker/ 2 cups for cooking rice in saucepan
1/2 lb ground pork
1/2 -1 lb. duck, or chicken liver
1 cup chopped white or yellow onion, 1/4 inch cubes/chunks
2 garlic cloves, finely minced
2-3 jalapenos or 1 green bell pepper, remove and discard seeds, ribs, then cut into 1/4 inch cubes,
2 celery ribs, cut into 1/4 inch cubes
2 green onion, thinly sliced
2 Tbs vegetable oil or duck fat, butter
2 teaspoon Cajun seasoning or a mixture of
     1/2 teaspoon Salt
     1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper
     A pinch of paprika, ground red pepper
     2 teaspoon fresh thyme

  1. Put rice into a medium saucepan.   Cover rice with cold water and lightly rub rice with one hand. Rinse rice with water 2-3 times. Pour water out.  Add 2 cups broth,  bring it to a boil over medium high heat.  Take the lid off, reduce the heat to medium. Stir 1 or 2 times.  Keep an eye close, when liquid evaporated and the rice surface getting dry. Stir, pick up a few grain of rice,  and cover, turn the heat down to medium low.  The rice will be cooked and turn soft tender in 10-15 minutes.  Stir and squeeze a grain of rice.  Rice is done when being soft all the way to the center without any hard core.  If not cover and cook a few more minutes, check in 5 minutes intervals. Remove from heat.  Stir 1 or 2 times more to separate grains.  If using a rice cooker, use 1.5 cups broth and follow manufacturer instruction.
  2. While the rice is cooking, clean  liver.  Cut and discard white, tough gristle parts.  Chop liver very fine-almost puree by hand or a food processor, or food grinder.   
  3. Clean and chop veggies. 
  4. In a large saute pan or skillet, heating 2 Tbs oil over medium high heat. Stir in onion, garlic until fragrant.  Stir in  ground pork, 1 tsp Cajun seasoning or 1/2 of seasoning mixture, stir a few minutes until cooked through with some light brown spots.  Add  pepper,celery,  sprinkle remaining seasoning, stir until veggies wilt or soft as you preferred.  If a lot of liquid is accumulated in the pan, turn the heat up to high and stir until most of them evaporated.  Add liver, stir quickly until liver just lost the red color about 1-2 minutes.  Add rice, stir until rice is coated well.  Taste, add more salt and pepper or Cajun seasoning if needed.  Toss in green onion and sprinkle some black pepper.  Serve hot or warm. Keep leftover rice warm in rice cooker or chill in the fridge and rewarm in microwave.

Ducky Dirty Rice of Hank Shaw

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